• D-SINE Africa

    Our long-term goal is to improve health equity.

    As health disparities widen globally, achieving improvements in health equity between and within regions is an urgent priority.

  • D-SINE AFRICA

    Data Science Center for the Study of Surgery, Injury, and Equity in Africa.

    D-SINE Africa Hub will focus on the intersection between injury and equity, leveraging data science to decrease the impact of trauma, surgical disease, and disparities on the population of Cameroon and SSA.

  • D-SINE AFRICA

    Advancing Data Science for Health Discovery

    We seek to explore whether advances in Data Science (DS) applied in the African context can spur new health discoveries and catalyze innovation in healthcare and health research on the continent

  • Research at D_SINE Africa

    Application of Data Science in the promotion of high impact & transformational research

    To promote novel, high impact, and transformational research applying data science to reduce the burden of injury and surgical diseases through epidemiological studies, prevention strategies, disease surveillance, and clinical care optimization.

  • D-SINE Africa

    Networking at
    D-SINE Africa

    To create and enhance connections between scientists, institutions, and stakeholders within its Cores, Projects, and the Harnessing Data Science for Health Discovery and Innovation in Africa (DS-I Africa) Consortium.

  • D-SINE Africa

    Capacity Development to Mitigate Health Issues

    To mentor and train researchers, policy makers, providers, community leaders, and staff members in advanced analytic methods and public health approaches to address critical issues in injury and equity.

    Data Science for Health

    Direct data science and public health research to reduce the burden of injury, surgical disease, and health disparities.

    Networking & Collaboration

    Promote networking and collaboration that fosters innovative Science, Technology and dissemination of research findings.

    Empowerment

    Support capacity building that propels junior scientists in sub-Saharan Africa to improve population health using data science.

    JOBS & FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

    Browse through our Job Openings & Funding opportunities. You are encouraged to apply for openings and opportunities for which you meet the eligibility requirements.

    Empowerment

    Support capacity building that propels junior scientists in sub-Saharan Africa to improve population health using data science.

    D-SINE Africa Overview

    The Data Science Center for the Study of Surgery, Injury, and Equity in Africa (D-SINE Africa) is a strategic partnership between the University of Buea (Buea), the University of California (Los Angeles (UCLA) and Berkeley), The Ministry of Public Health in Cameroon (MoPH), the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences in Cameroon (AIMS Cameroon), and the University of Cape Town in South Africa (UCT). We have partners from the Congo-Basin Institute in Cameroon, researchers from Soroti Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda, and the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services.  This coalition is built upon a long-standing collaboration between Buea and UCLA focused on decreasing the burden of surgical diseases in Cameroon and other sub- Saharan African (SSA) countries.

    Harnessing Data Science to Promote Equity in Injury and Surgery for Africa: Data Science Center for the Study of Surgery, Injury, and Equity in Africa - D-SINE-Africa

    Injuries and other surgically treated diseases comprise a significant burden of disease in Cameroon and other sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries with deep inequities that are particularly unmasked in acute care settings. D-SINE Africa Hub will focus on the intersection between injury and equity, leveraging data science to decrease the impact of trauma, surgical disease, and disparities on the population of Cameroon and SSA by promoting collaborative research, networking, and capacity building with an emphasis on equity.

    D-SINE Africa Hub

    Project 1
    EQUITY SURVEILLANCE

    MPIs
    Dr. Nguefack Georges (UB, AIMS)
    Dr. Alan Hubbard (UCB)

    CO-INVESTIGATORS
    Dr. Salome Maswime (UCT)
    Dr. Catherine Juillard (UCLA)
    Dr. Fanny Dissack-Delon (MOPH)

    Project 2
    TRAUMA OUTCOMES PREDICTION

    MPIs
    Dr. Catherine Juillard (UCLA)
    Prof. Chichom Mefire Alain (UB)

    CO-INVESTIGATORS
    Assoc. Prof Tendongfor Nicholas (UB)
    Dr. Sandy McCoy (UCB)
    Dr. Alan Hubbard (UCB)
    Dr. Sithombo Maqungo (UCT)
    Dr. Fanny Dissack-Delon (MOPH)

    3
    FUTURE PROJECTS

    1) SEED GRANT PROJECTS
    2) CENTER PROJECTS
    3) DS-I CONSORTIUM PROJECTS

    SEED GRANT ADMINISTRATION
    Program Officer : Prof. Lucy Ndip (UB)
    Dr. Sandy McCoy (UCB)
    Prof. Alain Chichom (UB)
    Mr. Esoh Nnoko (UB)

    Projects

    Project 1:
    HEALTH EQUITY SURVEILLANCE

    The overall objective is to apply A novel cluster-based algorithm to estimate socio-economic status for health equity surveillance in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Our long-term goal is to improve health equity.

    Currently, in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), health equity surveillance is not regularly implemented, in large part due to the difficulty in measuring socioeconomic status (SES). The lack of a quick, reliable metric of SES severely hinders researchers’ ability to study and reduce health disparities.

    Project 2:
    TRAUMA OUTCOMES PREDICTION

    Using data-adaptive methods to optimize follow up of injured patients after hospital discharge in Cameroon.

    Our long-term goal is to significantly improve health in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Approximately 9% of the world’s deaths, more than 5 million deaths annually, are due to injury.

    The research and funding investment in the study of injury is not commensurate to the magnitude of the problem. The people of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are disproportionately affected by injury. To significantly improve the health in SSA, there is an urgent need for effective, innovative, and scalable approaches to reduce morbidity and mortality from injury.